Metavalent Stigmergy

[ . home . | . meta . | . stop . | . think . ]

Subscribe with RSS Subscribe with Patreon Talk Story on Discord Launch Scheduled Zoom Call Follow on X

How New Default Consensus Realities Instantiate

4 June 2023

And it's a Typical Day on the Road to Dystopia

by metavalent

From the totally-missed-the-point department

Thus Spoke Chatty McChatface:

“Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley presents a dystopian vision of the future where individual freedom and personal choice are sacrificed for the sake of societal stability and uniformity.

The characters live in a society that promotes promiscuity and discards the concept of monogamy, encouraging citizens to view their bodies as communal property. “Everyone belongs to everyone else” is a motto frequently reiterated in the society.

The message could be perceived as a caution against the extreme commodification of the human body and sexuality, where personal relationships are deprived of their emotional depth, and intimacy is stripped of its individual meaning.

Furthermore, Huxley seems to be warning against the dangers of a society where people are engineered to be content with their roles, even when it involves surrendering their personal autonomy and freedom.

The idea of one’s body not belonging to oneself but to the society could be a critique of extreme forms of societal control and the dehumanizing effects of such systems.

The moral isn’t that everyone should share their bodies because they do not belong to them, but rather a critique of a society that has removed personal agency and individualism to such an extent.

Huxley portrays a world where people have been conditioned to believe that this is not just normal, but also good and desirable - a stark contrast to the values of personal autonomy, individuality, and freedom typically held in democratic societies.

In short, “Brave New World” is a cautionary tale about the potential dehumanizing consequences of unchecked technological advancement, state control, and the sacrifice of individual freedom for societal stability.

tags: metavalent, - krishnamurti, - philosophy